The Final Word on Travel Intelligence & Executive Protection

Yes, I’m putting the executive protection/travel Intelligence topic to rest, but only after one final overview.

Below is a short summary of relevant ideas from the Travel Intelligence Masterclass held recently. Plus, I have included two important links below.

First, you need to check out the travel intelligence reading list. Any novice could knock out this list in a month, and then they’d have a great reservoir of information to pull from when they’re supporting the executive protection team with travel intelligence.

Second, I created a relevant list of resources for executive protection analysts to reference while they’re doing their research. This isn’t a comprehensive list, but you’ll find it useful (it’s a sample from the class).

Lastly, when’s the next travel intelligence masterclass? Most likely around he same time next year, but it’ll be on the East Coast. I’ll keep you posted. In the meantime, enjoy these free resources!


Big Ideas from the Travel Intelligence Masterclass

4 Basic Components

On the most basic level, travel intelligence is composed of 4 components: Principal Threat Profile, Country Background, Safety & Security, and Micro Research (specific threats as they relate to the principal's itinerary/destinations/etc.).

 
Travel Intelligence Executive Protection
 

We're Customer-Centric

In the same way the market-economy relies on the preferences of consumers, every aspect of travel intelligence depends on our consumer's preferences: form/structure, substance, problem/definition, followup/updates, etc.

No Remote Intelligence is as Good as a RELIABLE Source on the Ground

Is it feasible to have a network of professionals that spans your areas of interest around the globe? Maybe, maybe not. Another solution would be to seek assistance from someone who does have that network.

Social Media and OSINT

There is a ton of valuable information to be gained from surveying aggregate, public social media posts of a given geographic area—most of which can be viewed via geo-tagged maps without paid/premium memberships. However, I do like the premium services for their ease of use and key-word alerts!

Keep it Simple

Platforms like Google: My Maps (custom maps) are intuitive and simple for use across multiple devices and easy to share with team members.  In my research, no premium platform performs better. Although, there could be OPSEC issues if you needed to hide from Google, your trip information.

It’s Not About the Operations Center

When writing our travel intelligence, we should consider the consumer...and the consumer's subordinates, if there will be an operations center using your report as a basis for their continuous research before, during, and after the trip. Ask yourself, "How can I hookup the OpsCenter staff and set them up for success?"

Thanks for reading, and never miss an article by signing up for the EP Nexus email list—Click Here.

Travis

PS: Did you miss the Travel Intelligence Hacks 24-Page PDF that I sent back in March? Access it here.